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An intergovernmental trade agreement signed by Canadian ministers that came into force on July 1, 2017. Its goal is to reduce and remove as much as possible barriers to the free movement of people, goods, services and investment within Canada and to create an open and stable internal market. On December 10, 2019, the three countries reached a revised USMCA agreement. On January 29, 2020, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs Chrystia Freeland introduced the USMCA C-4 Transposition Act in the House of Commons[93] and passed the first reading without a registered vote. On February 6, the bill passed second reading in the House of Commons by 275 votes to 28, with the Bloc Québécois voting against and all other parties voting in its favour, and it was referred to the Standing Committee on International Trade. [99] [100] [101] On 27 February 2020, the committee voted to send the bill to Parliament for third reading, without amendments. Chapter 16 facilitates the temporary entry of citizens of the United States, Mexico and Canada whose activities are related to trade in goods or services or investments. NAFTA is a reciprocal agreement and Canadians will receive similar treatment when they enter the United States or Mexico. Chapter 16 is not a substitute, but complements our existing general provisions. A U.S.

or Mexican business person wishing to enter Canada may be considered in accordance with NAFTA and general provisions applicable to all foreign workers. On December 12, 2019, the Mexican Senate adopted the revised treaty by 107 votes to 1. [89] On April 3, 2020, Mexico announced its readiness to implement the agreement and joined Canada,[15] although it requested that its auto industry have additional time to comply with the agreement. [90] Since NAFTA is a facilitation agreement, the applicant should be given every opportunity to prove that the criteria for admitting business travellers are met and to provide the missing documents by other means, para. B for example by fax. The negotiations focused “primarily on car exports, tariffs on steel and aluminum, as well as the milk, egg and poultry markets.” A provision “prevents any party from enacting laws that restrict the cross-border flow of data.” [11] Compared to NAFTA, the USMCA increases environmental and labour standards and encourages domestic production of cars and trucks. [12] The agreement also provides up-to-date intellectual property protection, gives the United States more access to the Canadian milk market, imposes a quota for Canadian and Mexican auto production, and increases the tariff limit for Canadians who purchase U.S. purchasing countries.