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One of the best parts of The Big Bang Theory is to observe the relationship between Sheldon Cooper and all those with whom he interacts. You might think he`s relatively “normal” around his roommate, Leonard, but it couldn`t be further from the truth. Even after living and working together for years, Sheldon has always treated him as a tenant sharing the room. The rule on the denkoitus in the roommate contract was definitely addressed to Leonard, since Sheldon only participated in this kind of activity for years (and years…). Many of these rules seem to be right, and only about creating a great living situation, but it becomes increasingly clear during the series that most of them are actually only busy making sure that Sheldon gets his way. And if some of these rules may be in his favour by chance, there is no possibility that they will be fair. In short, if the roommates don`t agree, Sheldon`s voice wins. It means that Sheldon`s opinion always wins, which is not normal. As in the workplace, Sheldon makes an annual retrospective of Leonard`s performance as a roommate.

Leonard and Sheldon have already broken the rules of their agreement, but they have never left any of them homeless. Instead, it usually results in fines or silent treatment until they are cooled! The roommate agreement was in effect for most of the show; But since Sheldon moved in with Amy in Penny`s old apartment, it can be assumed that the agreement is no longer in effect. A quick check of the rents available on Zillow tells me that throughout Pasadena, CA, there are only four two-room units for less than $2000 a month. It`s a fairly narrow (and more expensive) market, and if Sheldon had known, he could use the reality of the rental market to get Leonard to rent with him, because Leonard`s other rental options were slim. Leonard would have no choice but to sign the roommate contract, even if he did not want to. Sheldon`s obsession with controlling takeovers is well known, but the clauses on trying for a new place to eat are bordering on madness. According to the agreement, “the choice of a new takeout restaurant requires a public hearing and a 60-day delay for comment.” This means that if a new place with an interesting appearance shows up, ordering dinner from them means two months of paperwork…